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May 31, 2016

The Largehearted Boy 2016 Fundraiser

Several large projects are scheduled for Largehearted Boy this year, including a long-awaited redesign, much-needed back end programming, a podcast series and two video series.

With advertising revenues having dropped precipitously and my innate disdain for adding advertorial to the site, I am reaching out to readers to help make these things happen. If you enjoy Largehearted Boy and would like to make a donation, it would be much appreciated and used toward adding interesting content and creating a better user experience.

I never envisioned that this site would become such an integral part of my life. Every morning I wake up eager to post the daily book and music news and links as well as the day's music and literary features. Posting weekly book recommendations from three of the world's finest independent bookstores (Atomic Books, Librairie Drawn and Quarterly, and WORD) has been an honor, and the Book Notes author playlist series continues to inform, surprise, and fascinate me. Thank you for continuing to make this dream possible.


Donate via PayPal:


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May 31, 2016

Book Notes - Claudia Casper "The Mercy Journals"

The Mercy Journals

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Claudia Casper's The Mercy Journals is an innovatively told novel set in a dystopia of the near future.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Posing profound questions about compassion, values, and our capacity for life-saving change, Claudia Casper performs a remarkably incisive and sensitive variation on the dystopian theme in this suspenseful and provocative tale of sacrifice and survival."


In her own words, here is Claudia Casper's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Mercy Journals:



Songs always inhabit my novels. Very little tells you as much about a character in as short a space as their taste in music juxtaposed with their life circumstances, especially if their taste is somewhat idiosyncratic, or out of left field. Music is one of the wild places we let our emotions really run free, so what songs a character loves reveals in shorthand miles and miles of their inner life. Of course people also adopt music as badges of status and persona too, but it is the songs that fling the gates of our heart open that interest me. Confession: In my adolescence that song was 'Time of the Season' by the Zombies. Hearing that song fills me to this day with surrendering yearning, a sense of danger, and my then-virgin's excitement about imminent sex and possession.

"Send in the Clowns" – by Stephen Sondheim

This smoky, melancholic song walked into my mind like a slightly shabby character in a rumpled tweed coat, not old, but the time of his youth long past. My idea of comedic relief in this rather intense novel is a chorus of singing worms who try to seduce my hero, Allen (Mercy) Quincy, who is suffering from PTSD retriggered by a relationship with a woman called Ruby, over to the other side of the grave. When he drinks after twenty years of sobriety, Quincy hallucinates the worms and they always appear in full party mode, like a Brazilian Samba group, or a Macarena chorus line, calling to him: 'C'mon over, the water's warm!' At the point in the novel when "Send in the Clowns" is sung, the worms are appearing for the last time and so the tone changes. The spokesworm clears his throat and steps into a spotlight in top hat and tails, with a silver-tipped cane; the rest of the chorus is dressed as various iterations of clown, rainbow wigs, Groucho glasses etc. The spokesworm sings "Send in the Clowns," only it's Send in the Worms. After the last line, 'Well maybe next year,' the spokesworm steps out of the spotlight with a wistful hopefulness, only temporarily defeated in his seduction of our hero, taking the rest of the chorus with him.

We tried to get the rights to publish the lyrics of the song but were denied, so I rewrote the passage using paraphrase and description. It's a wonderful song, expressive of the bittersweet, world-weary irony of missed opportunity that no human avoids in a lifetime. I should add that at my Vancouver book launch (literary book launches can be somewhat dry affairs), while Jamie Mauro played piano and sang "Send in the Clowns," I dressed up as a worm and mimed "Send in the Worms."

"Mack the Knife," by Kurt Weill, Bertolt Brecht and "Take This Waltz" by Leonard Cohen

The music of cabaret is a kind of dream stage, smoky, dark and red, with tables and people drinking and chatting and watching performances that are subversive and slightly unpredictable, risky as well as risqué. The subtext to cabaret's camp, ironic humour is that life is a short ride, and the emotion evoked an amused, melancholy detachment. The worms in their zeal to demonstrate to Allen Quincy that the other side of the grave is where the real party is, nonetheless have and aura of wistful sadness that the dance is brief and the cards are stacked.

"White Wedding" – Billy Idol

In the early days of writing The Mercy Journals, to the embarrassment of my sons, I put up a flash card on the bulletin board above my desk that read: 'Write like a Billy Idol bassline,' and somewhat paradoxically below: 'Walk softly, carry a big stick.' These words were a beacon to help me land on the quality of narrative I wanted - a direct, clear, raw passion - simple, but with a huge, raw emotional payoff – like "White Wedding" and "Rebel Yell." Idol's vocals deliver a satisfying punch to the solar plexus at the songs' climax. I wanted to achieve a Shakespearean quality of big movement below the surface of the story, elements that develop powerfully without ever being explicitly articulated. For a novel that begins after a die-off caused by climate change when human civilization is fumbling to a new beginning, with a global government, new laws and a main character, Allen Quincy, an ex-soldier who's numbed himself to survive severe PTSD by keeping his life as banal and routine as possible until a dancer wearing red high heels walks into his life – the lines: 'It's a nice day to START AGAIN!' were pitch perfect.

The unleashing of desire in "Rebel Yell," the burn it up, tear it down rage (more in the music than the lyrics for sure – Johnny Rotten did after all call Idol the Perry Como of Punk) fits Ruby, the dancer, ('Last night a little dancer came dancin' to my door') who has a predatory aspect to her, a lasered-in intensity. Her prey is not getting away.

When I was writing the love scenes between Ruby and Allen, Golden Earring's "Radar Love" also hit my inner soundtrack with its driving, straightforward, compelling rhythm. The Youtube video, however, is quite funny in that you could not get a less enthusiastic crowd; everyone is so deadpan and disconnected, not even one toe taps (is it a Dutch thing?)

"Fado" – Amalia Rodrigues

The wondrous character Ruby, the slightly feral embodiment of Kali, goddess of destruction and creation, walks into Allen Quincy's tamped down life and resurrects him follicle by follicle, at first sexually, but given that sex is also a form of communication, also with her bravery, her ability to accompany his destroyedness, and her ferocious appetites, which pull him back to life. During her performance in a university theatre in Seattle in the year 2047, she sings a Fado song in the dark, a spotlight slowly coming up on her, accompanied in the shadows by a lone guitarist. Fado is an old Portuguese singing tradition that embodies the expression of 'saudades', translated as longing – the quintessence of the pain of bonding with another person, which we have to do to survive after our first wail out of the birth canal, and then inevitably losing the people we are bonded to to death or heartbreak. Fado singers still wander from bar to bar in Lisbon, singing for their supper and/or drinks. Ruby also lives close to the edge, surviving through her performances. Amalia Rodriguez, the magnificent singer who popularized Fado from the 50s to the 70s and who was known as the femme fadista, embodies the form. Her singing expresses a female rawness and an almost Platonic ideal of yearning. The inevitable loss in living becomes more bearable in the embrace of her deep, warm, soaring voice.

"In for the Kill (Skream Remix Let's Get Ravey)" - La Roux

Eleanor Jackson's powerful vocals from La Roux's "In for the Kill" give me goose bumps in this remix by SKREAM, which is purer and crisper than the original. The lyrics: 'I'm going in for the kill, I'm doing it for a thrill' capture Ruby's predatory side and her wild, unstructured, direct approach to satisfying her appetites after the loss of so much in this post-climate change world. Jackson's vocals are unmediated and clear, without the trills and coy memes so often imposed on female vocalists. Still thrills me.

Come As You Are – Nirvana

God this song. I sing along every time. The pain-infused, dark, haunting vocals of Cobain – there can be no better musical expression of my character, Allen Quincy, who at the opening of this novel sits alone in his kitchenette, an empty bottle of whiskey and his old service Beretta M9 on the counter in front of him, trying to hold suicide off as PTSD tears his mind apart. Later, when he is trying to win Ruby back by showing up at her dressing room, rather than spouting apologies he stands simply before her door and sings Come as You Are. (I would have loved to have the lyrics in the novel, but publishing rights are impossible to get.) Quincy decides to stop singing at the lyrics, 'And I swear I don't have a gun,' thinking, amusingly, they might give his ladylove the wrong idea. Memory is a major theme throughout, and late at night, battling the text, I would often play this song full volume and let it fill my jittery mind. Nirvana and Kurt Cobain are irreplaceable in this universe.


Claudia Casper and The Mercy Journals links:

the author's website

Booklist review
Publishers Weekly review
Quill and Quire review
Shelf Awareness review
Vancouver Sun review

CarolineLeavittville interview with the author
Eco-fiction.com interview with the author
Vancouver Sun interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Book Notes - Nick Seeley "Cambodia Noir"

Cambodia Noir

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Nick Seeley's novel Cambodia Noir is a compelling, fast-moving, and dark debut.

Bookreporter wrote of the book:

"Reads like a dark collaboration between Graham Greene and Hunter Thompson, with a dash of a coherent William Burroughs thrown in. … I loved every word of this gorgeous, frightening work... It's a drug that will stay in your system long after you think you've expelled it. And like a drug, it should come with a warning label. It's that good."


In his own words, here is Nick Seeley's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel Cambodia Noir:



1. The Postmarks – "Thorn in Your Side"
This album came out in 2009, and I fell instantly in love with its lush, 1960s-film-score sound and mysterious, evocative lyrics. It became a regular in my playlist as I was writing Cambodia Noir, conjuring up the kind of over-the-top energy I wanted from the story, particularly in the character of June.

2. Dengue Fever – "Made of Steam"
The story of Cambodia's lost rock n' roll heritage is a saga well worth discovering, full of great artistry and great tragedy. It's the subject of the documentary Don't Think I've Forgotten, by John Pirozzi, who also directed Dengue Fever's Cambodian tour documentary Sleepwalking Through the Mekong. The band covers Cambodian rock classics, as well as composing original works that blend Cambodian style with American indie rock, powered by singer Chhom Nimol's 10,000 watt voice. "Made of Steam" is my favorite of their new songs, with its fertile imagery that marries consumerism and tourism with evanescence, ephemerality and disappearance.

3. Tom Waits – "Shore Leave"
It's perhaps cliché at this point, but I hugely admire Tom Waits--both as a musician, and as a writer who can perfectly marry story, tone and character in a handful of words. One of my totems as I worked was to try and capture the mood of those great Waits songs from the '80s and '90s: exploding with fervid energy, bizarre characters and evocative, half-told stories. It's no accident that Channi in Cambodia Noir plays Heartattack & Vine in her bar. I listened to that album a lot while I was working, but my choice for this list has to be "Shore Leave," with its wonderfully spare descriptions of loneliness and longing for home.

4. Death In June – "Rose Clouds of Holocaust"
I had a couple Death in June albums on mp3 that I listened to heavily during my brief soujourn in Cambodia. The lyrics wove their way into fever dreams and Malarone fantasies, and their eerie gloominess and mythic overtones always seemed in perfect counterpoint to the landscape around me.

5. NIN – "The Way Out is Through"
Despite Nine Inch Nails' popularity, I've always felt the artistry of Reznor's symphonies of song and chaos has been rather overlooked, in favor of aggressive dance tunes. NIN has made some of my favorite writing music ever, particularly the four-disc instrumental Ghosts, the late album The Slip, and of course the band's masterpiece, The Fragile. This track is one of my favorites, a crescendo of menace. I also love the title, which echoes in koan form one the darkest sentiments of Shakespeare's Macbeth (III.iv) and Richard III (IV.ii)--a refrain I also have one of my viewpoint characters, Will, return to in Cambodia Noir.

6. My Bloody Valentine – "When You Sleep"
What is there to say about My Bloody Valentine's towering classic, loveless? Its lost, dreamy mood perfectly encircles the emptiness I write about. "When You Sleep" is the albums' boldest track, and one I come back to again and again.

7. Joy Division – "Atrocity Exhibition"
I listened to a lot of Joy Division while writing: like My Bloody Valentine, I felt it captured something of the mood I was looking for. The opening track of their final album is perhaps their most jarring and disturbing. It was written in strange demi-homage to J.G. Ballard's experimental novel The Atrocity Exhibition, which explored themes of mental illness and fragmented consciousness—issues that dogged Joy Division singer and songwriter Ian Curtis throughout his brief life. Indeed, Curtis' lyrics seem to reflect more his own tortured relationship with the audiences that came to observe his painfully raw performances than Ballard's book. Voyeurism, suffering, division of self: This song encapsulated most of the things I wanted to say about my main characters, and their relationship to Cambodia.

8. Poe – "Haunted"
I loved Poe's debut album in college, but it wasn't until years later that I learned that she was the sister of writer Mark Danielewski, who penned my favorite modern horror novel, House of Leaves, a postmodern epic of nameless dread. The book and Poe's album Haunted are companion works, both inspired by the siblings' relationship with their film director father—and both, for me, synonymous with terror.

9. Sinn Sisamouth and Ros Serey Sothea – "New Year's Eve (Jam 10 Kai Theit)"
A high-energy rock jam from the biggest stars of Cambodia's golden age of rock, in the 1960s. Both Sinn Sisamouth and Ros Serey Sothea disappeared and were presumed killed during the Khmer Rouge's brutal reign from 1975-'78, along with countless other artists and intellectuals. This song is a masterpiece, an icon of what was lost to ideology run wild, a reminder of the consequences of art in the face of violence, and a memento of a past that should not be forgotten. For me, it captures the wild energy of Phnom Penh nights and midnight moto rides.

10. The Clash – "Death or Glory"
I always felt a connection between the character of Will, in my novel, and early '80s punk and new wave music—perhaps it was some overarching sense of failed revolutions and broken dreams, now expressed only in a lost and rebellious culture. When this song came around in my workout playlist one day, as I was taking a break from writing, its resonance hit me like a ton of bricks. I knew it captured something about Will, and about Channi—so I wrote it in, playing in Channi's bar during one of their last meetings.

11. Cambodian Space Project – "I'm Still Waiting for You"
The Cambodian Space Project is another amazing musical project that celebrates, reimagines and improvises on classic Cambodian rock. Their Khmer-language cover of "House of the Rising Sun" is a monster, and the tension between Srey Thy's vocal performance and the memory of the American folk lyrics captures something inchoate but powerful about loss, regret, oppression and colonialism.

12. Robyn Hitchcock – "The Ghost in You"
Hitchcock is one of my favorite artists, and tiny references to his music are all over the text of the novel. (The working title of the book was actually "A Woman's Shadow," drawn from another Hitchcock song…) His cover of The Psychedelic Furs song "The Ghost in You" was a concert favorite, long available as a bootleg, and I was over the moon when he finally released a studio version in 2014. The Furs was another totemic "Will" band for me, and this Hitchcock cover perfectly captures some of my favorite elements of both artists: dubious redemption, in the key of desperation.


Nick Seeley and Cambodia Noir links:

Booklist review
Bookreporter review
Kirkus review
New York Journal of Books review
Publishers Weekly review
Shelf Awareness review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Shorties (An Excerpt from Jonathan Safran Foer's New Novel, The 40th Anniversary of The Man Who Fell to Earth, and more)

Read an excerpt from Jonathan Safran Foer's forthcoming novel Here I Am at the New Yorker.


Consequence of Sound reconsidered David Bowie's film The Man Who Fell to Earth 40 years after its release.


May is Largehearted Boy's first fundraising month. All donations will go toward creating new features, crafting a better user experience, and much-needed back end work on the site. Thank you for reading and supporting Largehearted Boy.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Harold and Maude by Colin Higgins
Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted: And all the Brilliant Minds Who Made The Mary Tyler Moore Show a Classic by Jennifer Keshin Armstrong
Prayers for the Living by Alan Cheuse


The Rumpus interviewed author Louise Erdrich.


Rich Cohen discussed his book The Sun & The Moon & The Rolling Stones with World Cafe.


David Means discussed the difference between writing novels and short stories with the Guardian.


Watch Courtney Barnett cover the Grateful Dead's "New Speedway Boogie."


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Evie Wyld's graphic novel Everything Is Teeth.


Stream a new Dinosaur Jr. song.


Authors Ron Tanner and James Magruder interviewed each other at The Nervous Breakdown.


Gorilla Vs. Bear is streaming its favorite singles from May.


The Barnes and Noble Review interviewed Lindy West about her new memoir Shrill.


Weekend Edition interviewed Beth Orton about her new album Kidsticks.


Design*Sponge interviewed author Tanwi Nandini Islam.


Noisey interviewed singer-songwriter Marissa Nadler.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Adrian Van Young.


Amanda Petrusich explored the history of prison music at Red Bull Music Academy.


Author Antonio Ruiz-Camacho recommended 10 books about Texas at Electric Literature.


MTV reconsidered Sonic Youth's Evol album 30 years after its release.


The Guardian listed the UK's best summer literary festivals.


The Arthur Russell archive.


Salon interviewed author Alice Walker on the 40th anniversary of the publication of her novel Meridian.


Financial Times interviewed singer-songwriter Darren Hayman.


Middle Eastern writers talked to the New York Times about their dysopian fiction.


Paste interviewed singer-songwriter Alejandro Rose-Garcia, AKA Shakey Graves.


The Times Literary Supplement shared an excerpt from Svetlana Alexievich's book Second-Hand Time.


The Quietus recapped May's best music releases.


Flavorwire recommended war novels for people who don't think they like war novels.


The Guardian profiled Iggy Pop.


Author Adam Phillips discussed his favorite books at The Week.


Paste ranked LCD Soundsystem songs.


Stephanie Danler discussed her debut novel Sweetbitter with Weekend Edition.


Carrie Rodriguez played a Tiny Desk Concert.


R. Zamora Linmark discussed the impact of her book Rolling the R's with All Things Considered 20 years after its publication.


The Strokes have opened an NYC pop up coffee shop.


Paste listed the best soccer books of the year so far.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


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May 29, 2016

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - May 29, 2016

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Largehearted Boy 2016 Fundraiser:

May is Largehearted Boy's first fundraising month


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Hirsh Sawhney for his novel South Haven
Jensen Beach for his short story collection Swallowed by the Cold
Jillian Keenan for her book Sex with Shakespeare
Juan Gómez Bárcena for his novel The Sky Over Lima
Lindsay Tigue for her poetry collection System of Ghosts
Manuel Gonzales for his novel The Regional Office is Under Attack!
Melissa Broder for her essay collection So Sad Today
Scott Esposito for his book The Surrender
Sean Carswell for his novel The Metaphysical Ukulele


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily literature and music news and link posts:

Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Cover Song Collections
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week


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May 27, 2016

Book Notes - Hirsh Sawhney "South Haven"

South Haven

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Hirsh Sawhney's novel South Haven is an unforgettable and unnerving tale of grief and migration.

Library Journal wrote of the book:

"[T]his luminous debut...captures precisely the heartache of growing up."


In his own words, here is Hirsh Sawhney's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel South Haven:



When I was writing my debut novel, South Haven, I was seeing and acquiring lots of music that was connected to the blues. This music helped me understand the pain and suffering of the characters in my book, which is about a boy named Siddharth who lives in a Connecticut suburb. Siddharth loses his mother in a car accident, and he and his father obviously endure a great deal of pain in the aftermath of this tragedy. The blues taught me how to give voice to their emotional aches and longings. While working on the novel, I also listened to a lot of jazz and psychedelic rock, and these albums reminded me of the need to constantly improvise as an artist—the importance of having plans, and the importance of knowing when to abandon them.


"Midnight in Harlem (Swamp Raga Intro With Little Martha)"
Performed by Tedeschi Trucks Band
Everybody's Talkin'

Before landing up in Connecticut, my protagonist Siddharth's parents migrated from New Delhi to New York, and this is a song about the harshness of migrating to New York City. I first learned about Tedeschi Trucks while commuting over the Pulaski Skyway in Jersey. They were doing an interview on WBGO Newark, one of my favorite radio stations. My wife and I later caught them live at the Gathering of the Vibes in Bridgeport, Connecticut, when I believed I was on the cusp on finishing the third and final draft of my novel. Little did I know that I had at least three more drafts and several years to go until the book would see the light of day. At the beginning of this track, there is a dreamy interlude called "Swamp Raga," and I love this shout-out to Hindustani classical music.

"Idiot Wind"
Bob Dylan
The Bootleg Series Vol 1-3

One day, someone was selling about twenty Dylan albums on a stoop in Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn, and I bought most of them for a buck a piece. This track on the Bootleg Series is so much better than the official version released on Blood on the Tracks. It possesses that blend of fictional storytelling, autobiography, and surrealism that defines much of Dylan's work, and also, as far as I can tell, the act of fiction writing. The images Dylan uses to show anger in this song are so vivid and visceral—"One day you'll be in a ditch/flies buzzing around your eyes/blood on your saddle." These lyrics were constantly repeating in my mind when I was trying to depict my characters' grief and the anger that it engendered.

"Louis Collins"
Performed by Jerry Garcia and David Grisman
Shady Grove

Mississippi John Hurt wrote this catchy, wry track about a death, and I love the way Jerry Garcia and David Grisman perform it here. I'm a huge Dead fan, and the Dead or one of Garcia's side projects was always blaring on my stereo while I was working on my novel. This recording contains a sweet blend of folk, blues, bluegrass, and rock—Jerry Garcia embodied so many wonderful aspects of North American music. The young protagonist of my novel listens to a Dead song for the first time towards the end my novel, and he's surprised by what he hears. The music sounds "kiddish" to him. It has nothing to do with the skulls or motorcycles that were associated with this music in his imagination. I loathe the stigma that the Dead often carry with them. Miles Davis used to open for them. They played with Branford Marsalis, and Jerry Garcia collaborated with Ornette Coleman and Elvis Costello. There is so much to their music besides a cult following, and I think this track might make Garcia's music more accessible to non-fans.

"Lamento Sertanejo"
Gilberto Gil
Rafezanda

I deeply admire the Brazilian musician Gilberto Gil, and I've had the privilege of seeing him perform at various venues in New York City. As my sister says, to watch him play live is to be enveloped in a long and warm hug. This song, however, is about the blues, and, like so much of the music I listen to, it seems to be about alienation and migration. The forlorn narrator of the song says—and my feeble translation from the Portuguese will certainly kill these lyrics—"I don't really speak/I don't really know anything/I'm really no better than stray cattle." These lyrics are so simple, and yet so piercing, and I drew on this type of terse, poignant interiority to help me conjure up the emotional world of my child protagonist.

"Yah Dhuniya Agar Mil bhi Jayee"
Words by Sahir Ludhianvi; Sung by Mohammed Rafi
Pyaasa Soundtrack

This track, sung by the legendary Indian singer Mohammed Rafi, contemplates the worthiness of material success in a world defined by moral corruption, and it comes from the classic Hindi film Pyaasa (1957)—Thirsty—about an earnest poet named Vijay who is totally marginalized and then taken advantage of by the modern literary marketplace. Most writers can relate to Vijay, at least at some point in their career, and I certainly did when sending out my book to agents. The song's lyrics were written by a serious Urdu poet, Sahir Ludhianvi, and yet the instrumentation behind the words are more kitsch and European—so this track, like my characters, is a hybrid. The adult characters in my novel—Indian immigrants in the US who are highly Islamophobic—adore the music of singer Mohammed Rafi, even though he is a Muslim. That's the way it always seems to go, and it's a damn shame: People's prejudices often have nothing to do with their lived experience of reality.

"So What"
Miles Davis
The Complete 1962 Concert: My Funny Valentine + Four and More

I can still remember the day I bought Miles Davis' In A Silent Way—on a whim—at the great Cutlers Records in New Haven, which has now been replaced by an Apple store. (What a great metaphor for the state of culture in these United States!) But like so many jazz fans, my first taste of Miles was on Kind of Blue—the "catnip" of jazz albums according to one New York Times critic. One of my characters, a wise and sensitive girl named Sharon, plays a mean version of "So What" in front her entire junior high school, where she doesn't have many friends. The novel doesn't mention the song by title, but this is the track that played in my mind when I wrote this scene, which was partly inspired by James Baldwin's story "Sonny's Blues."

"Where Did You Sleep Last Night"
Nirvana
Unplugged

Kurt Cobain's suicide haunts my whole novel, and the characters in my book listen to Nirvana. One of them says that all pop music in the 90s was "materialistic and superficial", except for Nirvana. Another character calls Nirvana a bunch of "posers." I don't agree with either of these statements, but I am grateful that Nirvana introduced me to this Lead Belly song when I was just fourteen. (I didn't learn who Lead Belly was for another eight years or so.) Nirvana's Unplugged session blew my mind when I first heard it, and my friends and I managed to make an audio recording of it from a VHS cassette, several months before the official album was actually released.


Hirsh Sawhney and South Haven links:

the author's website

Library Journal review

Bookslut interview with the author
New Haven Register profile of the author
Penmen Review interview with the author
Radio Something interview with the author
Tidings from Hazel Kahan interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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This Week's Interesting Music Releases - May 27, 2016

Mark Kozelek

Mark Kozelek's covers album Sings Favorites is my favorite new album this week.

Other new releases I can recommend include Big Thief's Masterpiece, The Hotelier's Goodness, Summer Cannibals's Full of It.

Archival releases include the 3-LP live David Bowie album A Reality Tour three sets of Frank Zappa live recordings (Road Tapes, Venue #1, Road Tapes, Venue #2, Road Tapes, Venue #3), a remastered and expanded edition of My Morning Jacket's It Still Moves, and a Siouxie and the Banshees' 6-CD box set Classic Album Selection Volume 2.

What new releases can you recommend this week?


This week's interesting music releases:

50 Foot Wave: Bath White EP
Architects: All Of Our Gods Have Abandoned Us
Arthur Beatrice: Keeping The Peace
Band of Skulls: By Default
Beth Orton: Kidsticks
Big Thief: Masterpiece
Catfish and the Bottlemen: The Ride
Daniel Romano: Mosey
David Bowie: A Reality Tour (180 Gram Audiophile Translucent Blue Vinyl/Limited Edition/3 LP Box Set) [vinyl]
Death Angel: The Evil Divide
Dierks Bentley: Black
Emily Barker: Despite the Snow (reissue)
Flume: Skin
Frank Zappa: Lumpy Money Project/Object (reissue)
Frank Zappa: Road Tapes, Venue #1
Frank Zappa: Road Tapes, Venue #2
Frank Zappa: Road Tapes, Venue #3
Gold Panda: Good Luck And Do Your Best
Gregory Porter: Take Me to the Alley [vinyl]
Gwen Stefani: This Is What the Truth Feels Like [vinyl]
Holy F**k: Congrats
The Hotelier: Goodness
Kendrick Lamar: untitled unmastered. [vinyl]
Kristin Kontrol: X-Communicate
Lacuna Coil: Delirium
Lone: Levitate
Manic Street Preachers: Everything Must Go (5-CD box set)
Mark Kozelek: Sings Favorites
Mark Mothersbaugh: Pee-wee's Big Holiday: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Miles Davis and Robert Glasper: Everything's Beautiful
The Monkees: Good Times!
The Muffs: Blonder and Blonder (reissue)
My Morning Jacket: It Still Moves (remastered and expanded)
The Myrrors: Entranced Earth
Nick Allbrook: Pure Gardiya
Pontiak: Maker (reissue) [vinyl]
PUP: The Dream Is Over
Quasi: Featuring "Birds" (reissue) [vinyl]
Real Friends: The Home Inside My Head
Siouxie and the Banshees: Classic Album Selection Volume 2 (6-CD box set)
Skepta: Konnichiwa
Sonny & the Sunsets: Moods Baby Moods
Summer Cannibals: Full of It
Thrice: To Be Everywhere Is To Be Nowhere
Tony Joe White: Rain Crow
Travis: Everything at Once
Various Artists: Alice Through the Looking Glass (soundtrack)
Various Artists: Bright Star (Original Broadway Cast Recording)
Various Artists: Paint Your Wagon (Encores! Cast Recording 2015)
Various Artists: Space Echo: Mystery Behind the Cosmic Sound
Various Artists: The Warriors (soundtrack) (remastered) [vinyl]
Yumi Zouma: Yoncalla
Zack Lopez: Bloodlines


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

weekly music release lists

Essential and Interesting 2015 Year-End Music Lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)


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Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - May 12, 2016

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Twilight Children

Twilight Children
by Gilbert Hernandez

Legendary comic creator Hernandez has once against delivered a sexy, mind-bending tale unlike any other. When mysterious, glowing spheres start appearing from the water of a small, seaside town, the residents don’t know how to react. They blind children, bestow them with psychic powers, and cause inexplicable havoc. Beautiful drawn and expertly told, Twilight Children explores the sociological and psychological effects of sci-fi magic in graphic form.


The Anatomical Venus: Wax, God, Death & the Ecstatic

The Anatomical Venus: Wax, God, Death & the Ecstatic
by Joanna Ebenstein

Morbid and deeply erotic, the Anatomical Venus stands out as being one of the most singularly compelling artifacts to grace the pages of the history of medicine. Featuring over 250 images of the life-sized, dissectible wax woman reclined on moth-eaten cushions, Ebenstein’s newest, extensively researched book pinpoints humanity’s curiosity with beauty and death - the Venus’ femininity serving as a confounding explanation of both.


Sea Change

Sea Change
by Frank Viva

Straddling the line between picture books and literary fiction, Frank Viva’s newest kids’ book elevates a simple coming-of-age tale into an enigmatic daydream. Chronicling a twelve year old boys summer ‘vacation’ to a rural fishing village in Nova Scotia, Viva illustrates a summer filled with grumpy old men, angry lobsters, and awful teenagers, but allows for these experiences to bubble beneath the surface of the narrative; charting Eliot’s (our protagonist) change from twelve year old boy into something else entirely.


Sweetbitter

Sweetbitter
by Stephanie Danier

While the promise of being yet another “coming-of-age” story might throw off some potential readers, Danier’s debut novel is a brilliantly written, page-turning tale that is fueled by burgeoning wisdom and ample doses of cocaine. A mixture of Kitchen Confidential with a pinch of Sex and the City, Danier’s novel takes us through the Manhattan of 22 year-old Tess in the heatwave of summer 2006; her powerful writing carrying the novel into uncharted, passionate territory.


Little Labors

Little Labors
by Rivka Galchen

A collection of short stories, essays, and general observations about literature, babies, and mothering said babies, Galchen’s new, orange pocket-sized book is both sharp and undeniably hilarious. Inspired by The Pillow Book - a book of observations and musings recorded during the 990s and early 1000s in Japan - Little Labors reads as a well-composed train of thought; Galchen’s talent taking the reader on a journey through the ordinary-extraordinary. Hailed as subtly re-inventing the memoir as we know it, Little Labors is a joy to read.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Online "Best Books of 2015" Year-end Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Atomic Books Comics Preview - May 26, 2016

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


After Nothing Comes

After Nothing Comes
by Aidan Koch

Edited by Bill Kartalopoulos, After Nothing Comes collects a number of Koch's early works - showing the poetic and painterly origins of the Koch style. The works here resonate in unexpected ways.


Don't Come In Here

Don't Come In Here
by Patrick Kyle

A story told in unfolding vignettes, Don't Come In Here is an abstract comics exploration of the disorienting nature of being an artist.


From Now On

From Now On
by Malachi Ward

I was so anxious for this book, when it missed its shipping date, I couldn't help but sending an email to the publisher to make sure it was still coming (sorry, Alternative Comics, and thanks for being so awesome!). From Now On collects a number of Ward's beautiful short works, some previously published, some not. Some in color, some not.


Lovf: The Illustrated Diary Of A Man Literally Losing His Mind

Lovf: The Illustrated Diary Of A Man Literally Losing His Mind
by Jesse Reklaw

I first encountered Lovf as a mini-comic, and what struck me about it was how radically different the art is from most of Reklaw's other work. Moody, colorful, watercolory - manic - and intense. If Bill Sienkiewicz was making underground comics today, they might look something like this.


Space: An Eschew Collection

Space: An Eschew Collection
by Robert Sergel

Like Lovf, I first came across Space as mini-comics called Eschew. I was struck then, as now, by their precision, their containment - in terms of art as well as narrative.


Turning Japanese: A Graphic Memoir

Turning Japanese: A Graphic Memoir
by MariNaomi

MariNaomi continues to mine her rich past for material. Set in the mid-'90s, she reflects on her time as an illegal Japanese hostess while also revealing cultural and generational differences.


What Is Obscenity? The Story Of A Good For Nothing Artist And Her Pussy

What Is Obscenity? The Story Of A Good For Nothing Artist And Her Pussy
by Rokudenashiko

It may be hard to define, but do we know it when we see it. Or do we? Rokudenashiko is a Japanese artist who has been jailed for their art for posing questions similar to the one this book asks, which is "What is so problematic about the pussy?"


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2015" Book Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Shorties (Recommended Summer Reading, Loudon Wainwright III's New Donald Trump Song, and more)

The New York Times and Chicago Tribune recommended books for summer reading.


Loudon Wainwright III shared a new song that imagines a Donald Trump presidency.


May is Largehearted Boy's first fundraising month. All donations will go toward creating new features, crafting a better user experience, and much-needed back end work on the site. Thank you for reading and supporting Largehearted Boy.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Harold and Maude by Colin Higgins
Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted: And all the Brilliant Minds Who Made The Mary Tyler Moore Show a Classic by Jennifer Keshin Armstrong
Prayers for the Living by Alan Cheuse


The British Library's "Discovering the 20th Century" website is fascinating.


Tony Tulathimutte shared the process of fighting for the title of his debut novel Private Citizens at the Paris Review.


Stream a new Silent Pictures song.


Hazlitt interviewed author Mona Awad.


Stereogum interviewed Jim James about the remastered and expanded edition of My Morning Jacket's It Still Moves album.


Chris Cleave recommended books written during World War II at Literary Hub.


The band Quilt visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


The New York Times profiled author Emma Straub.


Actor Elijah Wood discussed his favorite albums with The Quietus.


Literary Hub profiled author Miranda Beverly-Whittemore.


Stereogum listed Sufjan Stevens' best songs.


Signature recommended books to read while waiting for Gilmore Girls to return to television.


Noisey shared an oral history of Propaghandhi's Less Talk, More Rock album, released 20 years ago.


Entropy interviewed Lavinia Ludlow about her new novel Single Stroke Seven.


Pity Sex's Britty Drake paired three of the band's songs with non-musical influences at The A.V. Club.


The Miami Herald recommended books about Haiti.


Paste profiled singer-songwriter Andy Shauf.


Vogue profiled authors Emma Cline and Yaa Gyasi.


The A.V. Club previewed June's music releases.


Huffington Post recommended short stories to read online.


Stream two new songs by the Strokes.


BuzzFeed featured new short fiction by Lucy Corin.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

May 26, 2016

Book Notes - Juan Gómez Bárcena "The Sky Over Lima"

The Sky Over Lima

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Juan Gómez Bárcena's novel The Sky Over Lima is an engaging debut that deftly explores themes of class, friendship, and creativity.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Bárcena grounds the literary games in a richly detailed, early 20th-century Lima and its cast of secondary characters: dock workers, prostitutes, café-haunting literati. Its lightly ironic tone darkening as it proceeds, the novel sensitively explores how a literary prank shapes the sentimental, romantic, and moral education of Carlos."


In his own words, here is Juan Gómez Bárcena's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel The Sky Over Lima:



The Sky Over Lima is set in the Peru of 1904. Nevertheless, its narrator transcends continents and centuries. Let's imagine this narrator puts together a soundtrack: someone capable of living in 1904 and 2014 at the same time, someone able to take Leonard Cohen back to the beginning of the 20th century and bring Víctor Jara's verses to life once more, allowing them to cry out against injustices perpetrated thirty years before the singer was even born. This would be that soundtrack.

"Vertigo (Love scene)" – Bernard Herrmann

Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo is not only my favourite movie, but was also a constant source of inspiration while I was writing "The Sky over Lima". A man in love with a dream, a made up woman, a sick romantic idealization… The film touches upon many of the subjects of my novel. A journalist once asked Hitchcock what his film was about. His answer: "It is about a man who wants to make love to a ghost." I think that same definition would also be a good synopsis for The Sky Over Lima.
Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard – Paul Simon

Carlos Rodríguez and José Gálvez are two Peruvian friends, just boys who want to become poets. And, as in Paul Simon's song, at some point they decide to "break the rules:" they write to their favorite poet, the Spanish maestro Juan Ramón Jiménez, impersonating a gorgeous young lady, hoping he will make her his muse.

Sweet Georgina Brown – Django Reinhart

The girl could have been called "Georgia Brown," but they decided to give her a more exotic name: Georgina Hübner. And the two friends had a great time doing it, in keeping with this cheerful rendition by Django Reinhart, because creating a literary character is a fun thing to do…

Wish You Were Here – Pink Floyd

…that is, when things don't get twisted and the poet Juan Ramón Jiménez falls in love with your character from the other edge of the world. And the poet of course wants Georgina to be in Spain with him, to hold her in his arms. Something of a problem, considering Georgina has no body to hold and only exists in a handful of letters, scribbled with wit and an almost childish cruelty.

No he desitjat mai cos com el teu - Marcel Bagés i Maria Arnal Dimas

"I have never desired a body like yours" say the verses by the poet Estellès sung by María Arnal, and there is no doubt Juan Ramón Jiménez could say much the same thing. That being said, his life would have been way easier if he had listened to the last verse of the song: "To hell with all verses!"

Famous Blue Raincoat – Leonard Cohen

This is a novel full of letters the characters sent incessantly to each other. I would have liked them to be as beautiful as this one that L. Cohen wrote for us all, and that I listened to obsessively while I was writing the novel.

Everybody Knows – Leonard Cohen

Everybody knows that the dice are loaded, that is, that Georgina isn't but a joke. Everybody except Juan Ramón, of course, who, letter by letter, will start planning how to meet his adored Georgina.

Playground Love – Air

But love in The Sky Over Lima isn't only of the platonic, idealized kind; physical love also plays an important role. For instance, prostitutes sashay through many of its pages. One of them is only a girl whose virginity is sold for an exorbitant price to the rubber tycoons in Peru. She is be the playground love of Carlos Rodríguez, himself barely more than a boy at the time.

Vientos del pueblo – Víctor Jara

Meanwhile, while Carlos and José play writing letters, Lima workers fight in vane for better working conditions and basic social rights. Some decades will have to pass before their demands are met. For the moment, the government prefers to shut up the people with gunpowder and blood, as Víctor Jara sings: "Again, they want to soil, my land with workers' blood/those who speak about freedom/ and have black hands."

For Emily, Whenever I May Find Her – Simon and Garfunkel

Simon and Garfunkel are persuaded that it is possible to fall in love with a dream, conceive a woman in fantasy and give in to her, just as Pigmalion did with his sculpture. This same thing will happen to Carlos Gálvez when he begins falling in love with his own character.

Gloomy Sunday – Billie Holliday

It's obvious that none of this will end well for anybody. Not for Juan Ramón, who falls in love head over feet for Georgina, nor for the boys, who aren't aware of how seriously their joke has been taken. Choosing "Gloomy Sunday" for the dénouement might be going a bit too far, as some have called this the saddest song ever; in The Sky Over Lima humor prevails always, even in the darkest passages. But my characters often enjoy drama, and who am I to contradict them?

Bookends – Simon and Garfunkel

Everything has an end, comforting or horrible, happy or sad, but an end at last. Carlos and José also have an ending, which comes many years later: a watchtower where they can reflect on the time gone by, about all that they've lost in the passing years.

Time it was
And what a time it was, it was
A time of innocence
A time of confidences

Long ago it must be
I have a photograph
Preserve your memories
They're all that's left you.


Juan Gómez Bárcena and The Sky Over Lima links:

excerpt from the book

Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
ZYZZYVA review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's 2016 Fundraiser

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Shorties (Summer's New Fiction, Two Profiles of Car Seat Headrest, and more)

The Wall Street Journal recommended summer's new fiction.


Flavorwire profiled Car Seat Headrest's Will Toledo.

The A.V. Club also talked to Toledo about the band's new album Teens of Denial and its now deleted Ric Ocasek sample.


May is Largehearted Boy's first fundraising month. All donations will go toward creating new features, crafting a better user experience, and much-needed back end work on the site. Thank you for reading and supporting Largehearted Boy.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Harold and Maude by Colin Higgins
Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted: And all the Brilliant Minds Who Made The Mary Tyler Moore Show a Classic by Jennifer Keshin Armstrong
Prayers for the Living by Alan Cheuse


The British Library's "Discovering the 20th Century" website is fascinating.


Stream a new No Joy song.


Karl Ove Knausgard on James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.


NPR Music is streaming Fantastic Negrito's new album The Last Days of Oakland.


Literary Hub interviewed author Julian Barnes about editing his work.


Laura Jane Grace shared an essay about her North Carolina performance last week.


New nonfiction from Alexander Chee.


Stream a new Spoon song.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed authors Nayomi Munaweera and Jung Yun.


NYCTaper shared a recent live performance by Luna.


The New York Times interviewed authors Michael Marissen and Lauren Belfer.


NPR Music is streaming Xenia Rubinos's new album Black Terry Cat.


The Spectator reviewed one of my favorite nonfiction books of the year, Juan Villoro's essay collection God is Round.


Stereogum is streaming Karen Meat's On the Couch EP.


The Chicago Tribune interviewed editor Chris Ying about his book The Wurst of Lucky Peach.


NPR Music is streaming William Tyler's new album Modern Country.


Tor.com listed essay collections, literary criticism, and biography that explore the craft of science fiction and fantasy.


SPIN profiled the band the Gotobeds.


Bookworm interviewed author John D'Agata.


NPR Music is streaming Paul Simon's new album Stranger to Stranger.


Newsday recommended summer's best new books.


Yahoo Music will stream select acts live from the Sasquatch music festival starting tomorrow.


Ebook on sale for $2.99 today: Barbara Kingsolver's novel The Poisonwood Bible.


The Cleveland Scene profiled singer-songwriter Jason Isbell.


Bustle recommended summer's best new nonfiction books.


Paste listed politicians who meddled in music.


The Wall Street Journal recommended summer books about animals.


Moby talked to Morning Edition about his new memoir Porcelain.


Comic Book Resources interviewed Evie Wyld about er graphic novel Everything Is Teeth.


Pink Floyd stamps.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

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