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October 30, 2014

Atomic Books Comics Preview - October 30, 2014

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics and graphic novels.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. The Mobtown Shank is his blog, and his comic Said What? is syndicated weekly in the Baltimore Sun's B-Paper.

Atomic Books has been named one of Bizarre Magazine's 51 geekiest places on the planet, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Basil Wolverton Weird Worlds Artist Edition

Basil Wolverton Weird Worlds Artist Edition
by Basil Wolverton

IDW's Artist Series has published quite a few impressive, over-sized, limited edition books , but this collection of legendary MAD contributor Basil Wolverton may be the best yet. It contains stories covering his career from Powerhouse Pepper, Spacehawk, up through his grotesques, his religious work and more. The result is simply WOW!


Found: The Early Years

Found: The Early Years
by Davy Rothbart

Davy Rothbart's ingenious magazine Found - collecting the best (and worst) of notes, letters and other miscellany readers find - will go down as one of the all-time best zines. For those who are late to the party, finding back issues of #1-4 can be a tad tough - so Found: The Early Years collects the best of those 4 issues into one very Found Magazine-like book.


Stray Bullets Volume 1: Innocence Of Nihilism

Stray Bullets Volume 1: Innocence Of Nihilism
by David Lapham

Lapham's crime cult-classic has been dormant for a long time. Recently, he came back to it - completing the original series' story-arc and starting a whole new one (Stray Bullets: Killers). This brings the long unavailable first volume back into print.


True Stories #1

True Stories #1
by Derf

One of my all time favorite alt-weekly strips was Derf's The City. Here the cartoonist collects the first of several planned volumes of "True Story" comics. The theme is that these are real things that the cartoonist witnessed that made their way into his long-running comic.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Said What?


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2013" Book Lists

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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October 30, 2014

Shorties (An Excerpt from Denis Johnson's New Novel, Stream Performances from Pitchfork Paris, and more)

Work in Progress features an excerpt from Denis Johnson's new novel The Laughing Monsters.


Stream live performances from the Pitchfork Paris music festival starting today.


Tor.com interviewed author Nicola Griffith.


New York magazine shared a "complete ebola-quarantine reading guide."


Impose interviewed Liz Harris of the band Grouper.


Jeff VanderMeer explored the power of "weird" fiction at the Atlantic.


PJ Harvey covered Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds' "Red Right Hand."


The Guardian examined running's benefits for writers.


Bookworm interviewed John Darnielle about his novel Wolf in White Van.


Paste shared a Halloween playlist.


NPR Books recommended graphic novels and comics anthologies for Halloween.


The Guardian listed 10 of the best Siouxsie and the Banshees songs.


R.I.P. poet Galway Kinnell.


Drowned in Sound interviewed singer James Graham of The Twilight Sad.


Author Kathleen Rooney made a case for reading political fiction at the Chicago Tribune.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


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Daily Downloads (The Moonbabies, The Sugarpills, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Copper Lungs: "Cloud Nine" [mp3]

David Bronson: "Songbird" [mp3] from Questions

ET Anderson: "It's Not the Same" [mp3] from Et tu, ____? EP (out November 18th)

The Moonbabies: "Chorus" [mp3]
The Moonbabies: "Raindrops" [mp3]

Skye Steele: "The People Make the Music" [mp3] from Up From The Bitterroot
Skye Steele: "Hiromitsu and Yuko" [mp3] from Up From The Bitterroot

The Sugarpills: "What's This?" [mp3]

Sykes: Gold Dust EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Matt Northrup: 2014-09-05, Raleigh [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

October 29, 2014

WORD Bookstores Books of the Week - October 29, 2014

In the Largehearted Word series, the staff of Brooklyn's WORD bookstore highlights several new books released this week.

WORD Bookstores are independent neighborhood bookstores in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Jersey City, New Jersey. Our primary goal is to be whatever our communities needs us to be, which currently means carrying everything from fiction to nonfiction to absurdly cute cards and stationery. In addition, we're fiends for a good event, from the classic author reading and Q&A to potlucks and a basketball league (and anything set in a bar). If a weekly dose of WORD here isn't enough for you, follow us on Twitter: @wordbookstores.


Yes Please

Yes Please
by Amy Poehler

Part autobiography, part advice manual, and part joke book, shares what she's learned and where and from whom she's learned it, replete with glossy images and positive reinforcement.


A History of the World in 12 Maps

A History of the World in 12 Maps
by Jerry Brotton

These days it's just another app, but throughout history, the map has been used to express more than geography and the distances between important points. Ancient maps show how people thought of themselves in relation to space, and so much else.


Hild

Hild
by Nicola Griffith

If you love Arthurian legends, medieval sagas, mythology, dreamy fantasy, and/or stunning world-building, pick up Hild immediately.


The End of Days

The End of Days
by Jenny Erpenbeck

This collection of "what if" scenarios blends the structural play of David Mitchell and the macabre realism of Patricia Highsmith.


WORD Brooklyn links:

WORD website
WORD Tumblr
WORD on Twitter
WORD's Facebook page
WORD's Flickr photos


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics & graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (Chuck Palahniuk Interviewed, Michael Stipe on Coming Out, and more)

Big Shiny Robot and Fresh Air interviewed Amy Poehler about her new memoir Yes, Please.


R.E.M frontman Michael Stipe discussed coming out at the Guardian.


Tin House interviewed author Rene Steinke.


Paste recommended music videos for Halloween.


Blake Butler recommended uniquely terrifying books for Halloween at VICE.


Songs for Whoever interviewed The War on Drugs frontman Adam Granduciel.


The Nervous Breakdown interviewed author Frederick Barthelme.


SPIN interviewed Thurston Moore.


Fresh Air interviewed Jill Lepore about her new book The Secret History of Wonder Woman.


PopMatters shared a retrospective on the band Sloan's discography.


The Hazlitt podcast interviewed Chuck Palahniuk about his new novel Beautiful You.


Evergig generates live concert footage from multiple fan videos.


The A.V. Club examines why Stephen King book to film adaptations often fall short.


The Guardian listed the top vampire books.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (Lauren Mann, Derek Webb, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Cabin Love: Thirty Nine album [mp3]

Cara Mitchell: "Suspended Motion" [mp3] from Afraid of The Dark EP (out November 11th)

Derek Webb: Lover EP [mp3]

Lauren Mann and the Fairly Odd Folk: Over Land and Sea album [mp3]

Mourn: "Silver Gold" [mp3] from Mourn (out February 16th)

Radical Face: The Bastards 3 EP [mp3]

Ryan Pryor: "Take Me Home" [mp3]

Street Spirits: Victoria's River album [mp3]

Various Artists: 2014 Nashville Indie Spotlight album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Purling Hiss: 2014-10-17, New York [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

October 28, 2014

Book Notes - Edward Carey "Heap House"

Heap House

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Edward Carey's novel Heap House is richly clever and dark, a macabre children's book that adults will also fascinate adults.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Full of strange magic, sly humor, and odd, melancholy characters, this trilogy opener, peppered with portraits illustrated by Carey in a style reminiscent of Peake's own, should appeal to ambitious readers seeking richly imagined and more-than-a-little-sinister fantasy."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Edward Carey's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Heap House:


A couple of years ago I did a drawing of an ill-faced young man with a large head and dark circles under his eyes, dressed in a scrappy dinner jacket. He became the hero of The Iremonger Trilogy, a trio of books I'm writing; the first is just out in the US, and I'm working on the third at the moment. The first book, Heap House, is set in Victorian London in an imagined borough where all the dirt and filth of London was heaved. In the centre of that vast mound of rubbish live the Iremonger family in a mansion made of up of hundreds of stolen buildings, and it is this misanthropic and cruel family that farms London's rubbish. The young hero is a fellow called Clod Iremonger and he has a special talent, or illness, that allows him to hear objects talking.

While I write I find it almost impossible to have any music to listen to, but when I draw or paint (I've been allowed to illustrate these books myself), I really find music enormously helpful. As I draw and listen I think very hard about the character I'm drawing and how he or she fits into the book, and of the book as a whole.

Ernst von Dohanyi, "Variations on a Nursery Theme"

Heap House is the first volume of the trilogy and it's a very gloomy (hopefully sometimes funny) urban fairytale. I love this piece by the Hungarian composer Dohanyi. It starts off as if we're listening to a terrible storm (the rubbish heaps in the book move like an ocean and have tides and break in waves against the sides of Iremonger's massive dwelling). From the storm in the music you suddenly begin to understand what the theme of the composition is, nothing more or less than "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star." The first time I heard it shifting from Wagnerian excess to a single piano playing the simple tune "Twinkle, Twinkle" I laughed in the sheer joy of it, as if he'd created a sort of Shakespearean tragedy of that nursery rhyme. Dohanyi has found a huge number of personalities in that simple tune we all know so well. This returning to childhood is something I think about a great deal in my writing.

Tom Waits, "The Briar and the Rose" from The Black Rider

Waits' lullabies are particularly moving and distressing. This one is full of the most heartbreaking lines, like, I tried to tear them both apart, I felt a bullet in my heart. His voice is so extraordinary, of course, and with the melancholy music in the background, the effect is devastating. I love Waits' writing, his rhyming, his use of language, his expressions of emotion. I think in some way the voice of my narrator is rather inspired by some of Waits' writing; he rhymes and half-rhymes all the time. This beautiful ballad is just one of many of Wait's songs that have inspired me. There are others in this album, including "November" – No prayers for November to linger longer. Sometimes I imagine my characters all trying to sing or howl on top of the very-chimneyed roof of Heap House.

Eliza Carter, "Accordion Song"

In my book the two young protagonists—Clod from upstairs, Lucy Pennant, an orphan servant, from downstairs, deep beneath ground—slowly come to know each other. It's a slow, rather awkward falling in love. This song is about falling in love and waiting for it to happen (or at least I think it is). It's about waiting to see what will happen, the thoughts before a couple actually manages to get together, wondering, anticipating. It's also far from twee; it's sort of laid back and no nonsense, and that's what Lucy is. So I like to think of this as her song. Eliza Carter's music was introduced to me by late brother. He loved her and because of him I love her music now. The book's dedicated to my brother and I can't help thinking of him when I hear Carter's astonishing folk music.

Michael Nyman, "Memorial"

This long, moving march—full of drive, repetition, and gaining, ever gaining in its energy—was (I think) written by Nyman originally in reaction to the Heysel Stadium Disaster when many football fans were crushed to death. It became the principal music to Peter Greenaway's film The Cook, the Thief, his Wife and her Lover. It's such a dramatic piece of music, like soldiers on a field slowly coming together, waiting for the inevitable crash, or unhappy people marching around a vast mansion with echoing empty rooms. Whenever I listen to it I think of the rubbish heaps rising and rising, the vastness of all that rubbish, climbing higher, rising and falling, the majesty of so much abandoned stuff, alive now, swirling and moving. When the voice comes, shrieking out, in at the end it feels like my characters are beginning to drown.

Madness, "Our House"

I always had a great affection for Madness as a child growing up in England. Whenever I hear this song I think of a doll house split in two and you can see the cross section of everyone inside up to their little bits of life. There's a great feeling of family in this song, and it's funny, too. I think of this great mansion in the rubbish heaps, of seeing it in a cross section cutaway, and peeking at all the uncles, aunts, cousins, grandparents, all those human ants getting on with their lives. One of the great things about this Madness song is how wonderfully mundane it is.

Tiger Lillies, "Souvenirs"

This song from the album Circus Songs is all about a member of the circus troop who can explain his life by showing off the souvenirs on his body, from scars to tattoos to memories of where he caught gonorrhea. It's a rather melancholy description of a person and all his past traipsing around. He's very eager to show anyone his body and so his past, a bit like Coleridge's Ancient Mariner. My story is a about the objects people have in their lives, and all the objects left and abandoned, thrown away, orphaned, all of which Clod feels for and hears talking to him. This song with its jaunty accordion and its small display of bravery and boastfulness, sung out in Martin Jacques' inimitable falsetto, always gets me in the mood.

Johnny Cash, "Dark as a Dungeon"

There's rather a lot of darkness in the trilogy I'm writing—the characters exist in small half-light. The limited strength of a candle is a very precious thing. There's always a terror of being left completely in the dark. In the final volume of my trilogy there's a talented aunt of Clod's who is able to spew night out of her mouth, sending all of London into perpetual dark. Also in the book people exist under the ground, and even those above it are fearful of drowning in the rubbish heaps. Cash's song can never fail to move and inspire; so many lost souls call out through his voice.


Regina Carter, "Hiwumbe Awumba"

This for me is a bit of sometimes needed optimism. It's a very joyful instrumental piece that builds in movement, adding more and more sounds to it but all with the same determined rhythm. It's real get-up-and-keep-going music. I listen to it and try and see my characters coming out through the darkness, as they try to find each other (Clod and Lucy spend much of the second book searching for each other)—along the way there are even small moments of joy.

Edward Elgar, "Cello Concerto"

I cannot tell how many times I've listened to this concerto since I started writing the third volume of the trilogy. I listen to it to try and figure out what on earth I'm writing, how on earth I can ever sew all the bits together, and as I try to think it out listening to this playing in my ears, I think of my people lost amongst the filth of London, trying to find their ways. I try and work out what will happen to them in the end. Even now I cannot decide who will die and who will live. I edge towards that page by page, but this music helps me to try and make some sense . . . and also to remember England a bit.

Handel, Fireworks music

This, as with Elgar, is a very, very English thing. I live in Austin, Texas (which is not an English thing). I've never been able to write about the country I came from before but now, slowly, hesitatingly, I am. George Friedrich Handel's music written for George III is a bit of a cliché of English pomp, but it's also amazing tub thumping music, very dramatic, and I try to see the great vast empire of Britain in its height under Victoria and all the poor, crushed people caught in its cruel cogs. In his day Handel helped support the beginning of The Founding Hospital in London, rescuing so many children from terrible fates. In the Hospital a mother would sometimes leave a small object with her baby before saying goodbye. These objects—a thimble, a button, a label for a bottle of gin—were all that was left for the child of the parent that bore them, all their history, so these objects take on a quite incredible importance. Listening to Handel's drums and trumpets I try to think also of buttons and bathplugs, of watering cans and matchboxes, of toothpicks and rusted tea strainers left out in the cold.


Edward Carey and Heap House links:

the author's website

Kirkus review
New York Times review
Newsday review
NPR Books review
Publishers Weekly review

Los Angeles Times interview with the author
The Velvet Nap interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - October 28, 2014

The Twilight Sad

Grouper's Ruins, Lily and Madeline's Fumes, and The Twilight Sad's Nobody Wants To Be Here And Nobody Wants To Leave are my favorite new releases.

The Flaming Lips' Beatles tribute album With a Little Help From My Fwends is also in stores this week.

Reissues include remastered and expanded editions of two Led Zeppelin albums (Houses Of The Holy and Led Zeppelin IV) and the Afghan Whigs' Gentlemen.

What new releases are you picking up this week? What can you recommend? Have I left anything noteworthy off the list?


This week's interesting music releases:

Afghan Whigs: Gentlemen at 21 (remastered and expanded 2-CD edition)
At The Gates: At War with Reality
Black Milk Shares: If There's A Hell Below
Creepers: Lush
Dan Bodan: Soft
Daniel Lanois: Flesh And Machine
Dillon Francis: Money Sucks, Friends Rule
Flaming Lips: With a Little Help From My Fwends
Grouper: Ruins
I Love You But I've Chosen Darkness: Dust
Lagwagon: Hang
Led Zeppelin: Houses Of The Holy (Deluxe CD Edition) (remastered and expanded 2-CD edition)
Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin IV (Deluxe CD Edition) (remastered and expanded 2-CD edition)
Leighton Meester: Heartstrings
Lily and Madeline: Fumes
Martial Canterel: Gyors/Lassù
Medicine: Home Everywhere
Mono: The Last Dawn
Mono: Rays Of Darkness
Mystery Skulls: Forever
Mykki Blanco: Gay Dog Food
Mysteries: New Age Music Is Here
Rancid: Honor Is All We Know
Pianos Become The Teeth: Keep You
Run The Jewels: RTJ2
Stalley: Ohio
Sylvie Simmons: Sylvie
Taylor Swift: 1989
The Twilight Sad: Nobody Wants To Be Here And Nobody Wants To Leave
Unearth: Watchers Of Rule
The Who: The Who Hits 50
Young Chop: Still
Yusuf: Tell 'Em I'm Gone


also at Largehearted Boy:

weekly music release lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (Gary Shteyngart's Book Tour Diary, A Luna Reunion, and more)

Gary Shteyngart is keeping a book tour diary at Page-Turner.


The band Luna has announced a 2015 reunion tour.


The Rumpus interviewed author Megan Stielstra.


Hypebot has kicked off a guide to crowdfunding music projects.


The New York Times profiled author Michel Faber.


My Morning Jacket covered Woody Guthrie's "This Land Is Your Land."


BBC News recommended books published in November.


SPIN ranked every Eminem song.


Flavorwire listed the best books by filmmakers.


Mapped By What Surrounded Them reconsidered The The's Soul Mining album 30 years after its release.


The Guardian looked back on the life of poet John Berryman, who would have turned 100 last week.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (Butch Walker, Oneida, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Butch Walker: NoiseTrade Sampler EP [mp3]

Cat Dove: "Vagabond Girl" [mp3] from Old Shoes

Creature Kingdom: Teeth Lips And Tongue EP [mp3]

Hill Man: Build a House EP [mp3]

Jack Burrell: I Will Run single [mp3]

Mock Ivey: The Complete Collection album [mp3]

The Ninetree Stumblers: Sigogglin EP [mp3]

Tucker Theodore: "Love, the Sun Explode" [mp3] from Kill and Dress

Various Artists: Folk-O-Rama: Volume Four album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Oneida: 2014-10-17, Brooklyn [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

October 27, 2014

Book Notes - Brian Costello "Losing in Gainesville"

Losing in Gainesville

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Brian Costello's debut novel Losing in Gainesville is a literary slacker epic, a book that brings to life the mid-'90s post-college Florida life.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"If Joyce was right that you could rebuild Dublin by reading Ulysses, you could definitely reconstruct a very specific American village of dive bars, record shops and drugstore cowboys from this slab of post-punk tragicomedy."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Brian Costello's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel Losing in Gainesville:


Like all the characters in Losing in Gainesville, music is the dead-center of my life. All of my friends are equally music-obsessed, and most of them also play in bands. I'm a drummer who writes, and not the other way around.

My novel is set in Gainesville, Florida in the mid-1990's. While it doesn't seem that long ago, looking back on that time now, what's interesting is that--for better or worse--if you wanted to find like-minded people, you had to go out into the world and find them instead of douching around on the internet behind your carefully cultivated social media persona or whatever. To meet potential love interests, you had to (gasp!) actually have conversations with them, and you'd sometimes even have to leave rambling messages on answering machines. To find new music, you had to leave your house and go to record stores, to shows, buy zines. If you lived faraway from the cosmopolitan culture centers, you had to make your own scene, find your own scene, and get off your ass and do it; these were the last years of doing so without a Mr. Google to hold your stupid hand and help you.

While this is a much better time for dating and playing music, what's lost is the freedom in toiling in the void, of, say, playing in a band where the only people who will ever hear it are your friends. I'm not nostalgic for that time, and I could be completely full of shit here...but there was something special in the magical moments of being young and finding yourself through music and through the camaraderie of those in your town who shared your passion for music.


Richard Hell--"Time": In the bedroom of the Orlando house Ronnie Altamont flees post-haste for Gainesville, there's this Richard Hell quote written on the wall: "Rock and roll as a way of turning sadness and loneliness and anger into something transcendentally beautiful, or at least energy transmitting." This is what Ronnie and all these characters are trying to do, in their own way.

The Who--"Cut My Hair": In the double album Quadrophenia, as Keith Moon made the whole kit sing in his finest musical moments, Pete Townshend captured the insane paradoxes and manic angst of being a teenager. You didn't have to be a mod to understand it. You could even be a high school band geek bashing a snare drum in Altamonte Springs, Florida. If this album didn't "save my life," it certainly got me through high school. And "Cut My Hair" perfectly encapsulates the conforming nonconformity of the subcultures you try to fit in with growing up.

Replacements--"Treatment Bound": When you spend enough time working on a novel, certain aspects surprise you, the things you didn't consciously plan. For instance, I was surprised at how often sunsets were described. I was also surprised at how much all the characters drank. One of the characters, rudderless after coming back from a bad tour with his hardcore band and unsure of what to do with his life, has to eventually come to terms with his drug and alcohol abuse. When I was a kid, I thought it was awesome how bands like The Replacements got shitfaced drunk and played sloppy shows. Now, older and with way more experience in playing in bands and living life, the romance of that has given way to the reality.

Spoke--"Mothra": I'll never forget when, a couple years into college, my friend Trey Romano came over with a copy of a Spoke record. We listened to it, blown away, and Trey said something like "It's amazing that these are friends of ours, people we went to high school with." There was something very inspiring about that, that this album was created by people we knew, kids who also attended Lake Brantley High School. I only saw Spoke once--at their last show at the Hardback in July, 1993 in Gainesville--and it remains one of the greatest shows I've ever seen, and it certainly helped me realize that a gawkward dipshit like me could also start a band, write stories, perform….

Red House Painters--"24": My favorite character in Losing in Gainesville is Portland Patty. She's living on the opposite side of the continent from where she grew up, and Portland is no longer home, and Gainesville never really was. She wants to believe that Ronnie Altamont is different from the other guys she's dated, but has to face the fact that he's just as screwed up as everybody else. She's also 25, an age when you get your first inklings that you too will one day get old, and is beginning to outgrow collegiate shenanigans. The very last page of Losing in Gainesville is a mixtape she made for herself. The songs are firmly rooted in the mid-1990's; when I finish a book, I feel like I'm saying goodbye to the past. Portland Patty's mixtape is a fond farewell to youth, to "those days," to everything that came out of that time.

Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band--"She's Too Much for My Mirror": I can't write while listening to music, but I'll take breaks, and a record I always return to and never get sick of is Trout Mask Replica. By this point, it sounds like a perfectly normal record to me. The rhythms are like no other, and once you're converted, there's no going back. Kill the 4/4 mama heartbeat and join us!

Albert Ayler--"Truth is Marching In": In grad school, I had a Russian Literature professor named Mark Davidov, a brilliant man who asked us to bring in a piece of music that we thought captured all facets of American culture like how Tolstoy did with Russian culture. While perhaps I should have brought in the theme to the TV show The Facts of Life, I instead brought in this free jazz masterpiece and forced the class to listen to all thirteen minutes of it at a very loud volume. To me it sounds like preservation jazz, the Civil War, 1960's riots, the chaos of conquering this land and simply trying to survive in it...and the drums sound like they're thrown off a cliff. I FUCKING LOVE THIS.

Nobunny--"Live it Up": The Hedonist's Creed. A reminder to have some f-u-n in this too-short life. Run out of the boring panel discussion, shitcan the totebag, and do the watusi.

Naomi's Hair--"This Song": A sweat-fueled Orlando three-piece that jumped around and fused the Minutemen with the Meat Puppets, drizzled in SST sauce. They inspired me like no other, and I can directly attribute seeing them at "Club Spacefish" night at the Beach Club in downtown Orlando as a teenager to me later doing all the creative endeavors I continue to do. So...Scott, Marty, and Joel, if you ever come across this in a moment of nostalgia-fueled self-googling...THANK YOU.

Rolling Stones--"Torn and Frayed": With Losing in Gainesville, I wanted to write a "triple album," with six sides/parts that each have their own moods and styles happening. My favorite albums are double albums, and I especially love the mood conveyed in side two of Exile on Main Street. By the way, the greatest book ever written about rock and roll is The True Adventures of the Rolling Stones by Stanley Booth. No joke. Even if you hate the Rolling Stones, the story itself (the events leading up to Altamont alternating between chapters leading up to the death of Brian Jones) is so well-written, it goes above and beyond the thing itself.

Minutemen--"The Toe Jam": One of my all-time favorite bands. For the musical risks they took, for the depth and breadth of subject matter they tackled in their lyrics, for the independent spirit they embodied...I'm eternally grateful. What Beefheart did for rock and roll, the Minutemen did for p-u-n-k: a sonic liberation from cliched thought and feeling.

The Stooges-"TV Eye": I've listened to Funhouse so many times by this point, and "TV Eye" never fails to adrenalize me….that "tell-tale tingle" in the spine Nabokov told us about.

Teddy and the Frat Girls--"Club Nite": God, this is so insane and so very Florida somehow. Ineptitude never sounded so, well...inept!

Electric Eels "Splitterty Splat": The story of Cleveland's Electric Eels is too wonderfully strange to go into here. One of the weirdest bands of genuine weirdos to ever hate on the world, and they were doing it way back in 1974.

The Kinks "Lola": Beatles, schmeatles. God Save the Kinks.

Vom "Punkmobile": Hilariously dumb/brilliant "punk" from 1978, fronted by one of the greatest rock-writers of all time, Richard Meltzer.

John Coltrane--"India": The purity, the risks, the unrelenting search for new sounds...spirituality in a sea of dipshits bragging about how atheist they are. There's an intensity at work that I've only ever experienced from reading Melville. The dedication and pursuit always inspires...


Brian Costello and Losing in Gainesville links:

Kirkus review

Curbside Splendor interview with the author
Newcity Lit interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Book Notes - Lynn Lurie "Quick Kills"

Quick Kills

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Lynn Lurie's Quick Kills is a vividly told and haunting novel, one whose prose and imagery will linger in your consciousness.

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Lynn Lurie's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Quick Kills:


The Quick Kills playlist is what the narrator would have been listening to. But it is also my playlist as it isn't entirely possible to separate myself from aspects of the story. The narrator's fear of abandonment as a child, her shame, as well as the longing to be somewhere else-- so far from where she is, that English isn't spoken— is central to the story. Female artists are predominantly represented, as I looked for someone to admire, actually, more like, mimic, and longed for this to be reciprocated.

1. Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit." "One pill makes you larger one pill makes you smaller the ones mother gives you do nothing at all" summarizes the little the mother in QK is willing to give. It also suggests the inherent danger that people we meet, randomly, can pose; how they give us things we may not want. For the narrator, "logic and proportion have fallen…", is emblematic of her circumstance, she lacks perspective and is trapped, unable to move from the hole into which she has fallen. Grace Slick was a beacon.

2. Bob Dylan, "Masters of War." There are images of the Vietnam War in QK. It was terrifying what I watched on the television set with my parents, in the comfort of our suburban home. The anger in this song so expresses the hatred I felt for having no means to address the suffering in the world that my parents seemed unmoved by, if not responsible for. I stole Tarantula from the public library. Whoever was in charge of book acquisitions back then did me a great favor. Bob Dylan was the antidote.

3. Julie Andrews, "Do Re Me." I have to include this because of the preamble to the book. I remember seeing this movie and thinking how ridiculous it was that they were singing as the Germans were coming. This sort of sugar coating and dishonesty was characteristic of what adults seemed to be so good at doing. "A name I call myself," was a partial and wholly unsatisfactory answer to the question of identity.

4. Patti Smith. The entire Horses album with its anger, its blood, its language and the freedom Patti Smith pulled from somewhere that allowed her to push everything away. I had never seen or heard anything so raw, so utterly unconcerned with the perceptions of others. I listened to this record with my best friend in high school in her blue floral room where we smoked pot and ate tubs of ice cream. At the time I didn't know Patti Smith was an artist or that there was a Robert Mapplethorpe.

5. Pentangle, "Wedding Dress." This mournful song about the making of a wedding dress, sung by a woman who gave of her brokenness in a quiet desperate way, made me stand still. The image of the golden thread being woven into the white, knowing that something horrible was looming, so captured my fear that truth is intentionally buried.

6. Natalie Merchant, "The Gulf of Araby." I didn't understand why I had such despair. I also had no idea what it was to love or to be loved, so songs where someone beloved was longed for, seemed a very legitimate and dignified reason for despair. It wasn't my source, but, I felt it somehow in the inverse, I could not mourn anyone and no one would mourn me. When Natalie Merchant sings grief becomes a character.

7. Victor Jara, "Duerme Negrito (Sleep Little Dark Boy)." My political adolescence was first Vietnam, then Cuba, which blurred into Central America and the dictatorships and political terror in the Southern Cone. I learned Spanish. I read novels and listened to albums in Spanish. This song tells the story of a mother working in the fields for no pay. The woman watching her son sings him to sleep. She promises the baby his mother will bring him all good things, if he sleeps. It is a lullaby. But like lullabies and fairy tales there is often the threat of violence, in this case, if he doesn't sleep someone will take the food he has been given. I don't recall anyone singing me a lullaby, but the idea is lovely.

8. Violeta Parra, "Volver a los Diecisiete (To Return to Seventeen)." Mournful and full of regret, Violeta Parra pieces together memories of being seventeen, which only deepen her well of sadness. The power of memory and how it has the capacity to destroy, for all is already written, is Violetta Parra, whose name even sounds like a poem.

9. Mercedes Sosa, "Sólo le pido a Dios. (I only ask of God)." I grew up without a sense of spirituality and equated some forms of religion with healing (Mother Theresa, Catholic priests in Latin America working for social justice and with lepers, Thich Nhat Hanh). It seemed that the adults I knew believed what they had they deserved. Material possessions were more important than knowledge and trumped any notion that one has obligations to the community. This song asks that one is never indifferent to the pain of others and that one never feels empty and alone because of his or her failure to address the suffering in the world. It seemed to be a national anthem, just not ours.

10. Suzanne Vega, "Night Vision." "Find the line, find the shape, find the outline and things will tell you their name" is a way to reconstruct memory from images, "the table, the guitar, the empty glass." The idea that things, if you allow them to, can tell you their names and once named they can elicit memory and meaning.


Lynn Lurie and Quick Kills links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review

Bookslut interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

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