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March 8, 2007

Shorties

The Nashua Telegraph previews Saturday's Lowell Celebrates Kerouac celebration in honor of Jack Kerouac's 85th birthday.


Tapes 'N Tapes and author Chuck Klosterman are guests for Minnesota Public Radio's Fakebook program.


Iggy Pop talks to Paste, where it's mentioned that he is the voice of the revolutionary uncle in the film adaptation of the graphic novel, Persepolis.


The Seattle Post-Intelligencer lists the top trends in teen literature.


REM's Michael Stipe talks to USA Today.

"Peter Buck always mentions the horse buggy whip factory and the feeling around the lunch table the day the automobile was introduced. That's the music industry, which is ripe for an immense recession. People either have their heads in the sand or they're trying to hold on to what still works and apply it to a completely new landscape."


Malajube vocalist Julien Mineau talks to Salt Lake City Weekly.

“First album, there was no budget—probably like $500. And it was the first time we ever recorded in a real studio, so we weren’t satisfied with the album,” lead vocalist Julien Mineau says in a phone call prior to the group’s current tour, adding that the LP at least generated enough sales and respect to justify a loan. “We get a lot of money from the government to record. You pay it back from a certain point. It’s pretty fun. It’s pretty good.”


The Riverfront Times and Broward-Palm Beach New Times preview local bands appearing at SXSW this year.


The Dallas Observer offers an IM review of Andrew Bird's new album, Armchair Apocrypha.


The Stranger offers tips to sell your CD on consignment at local indie records stores.

"If you're a band that I've seen in the paper playing out, I might not even listen to your CD until later; I'll just accept the consignment," says Troy Nelson, consignment master for Easy Street in Queen Anne. "If I've never heard of you, I'll listen to it and decide if it's something we can sell. We are an indie store, so if your CD is kind of Celine Dion–with-bongos adult contemporary, we probably can't sell it. We don't reject much, though."


The Hold Steady's Franz Nicolay talks to the Broward-Palm Beach New Times.

"I guess you could if you let it," Franz Nicolay, the Hold Steady's keyboardist, says when asked if the disconnect between critical and commercial success ever weighs on him. "I mean, we are one of the best-reviewed bands out there. That's a pretty good start."


The Stranger examines the world of indie music licensing.

"If we can sell 20,000 records and do a little licensing," Czeisler says, "a band can make a nice life for themselves. Why is that bad? Otherwise they can't make any more records and they can't keep playing, and that's, I think, a much worse fate than having their song in a commercial."


Ethan Rose of the Small Sails talks to the Portland Mercury.


The Seattle Post-Intelligencer lists the "2007 top ten best books for young adults."


Pine magazine interviews Kelly Crisp of the Rosebuds.


Radiant's Daniel Hopkins talks to Fort Worth Weekly.

“I admit, I miss the album as a complete artistic statement” that includes artwork and liner notes, Hopkins said. Most albums, he said, are merely collections of single songs that get passed along as individual digital files. “But you can’t buck progress,” he said. “I blog for the band [RadiantBoys.blogspot.com]. I also read blogs like Gorilla vs. Bear and Stereo Gum. They talk about great new songs. [The reviews you get there] have become as important as newspapers and magazines for a lot of people.”


Seattle's Stranger offers tips on how to "dress like a rock star."


For anyone attending SXSW this year, there are a plethora of local food suggestions at Chowhound's Austin board.


Singer-songwriter Elvis Perkins talks to Harp.

“It took a while for me to be my own person in the world,” he continues. “It certainly was difficult to establish an identity, with a father who’s become a cultural icon. And being named ‘Elvis’ also was a challenge to who I was, as Elvis [Presley] is also this monolith of a person. So, I think all of that contributed to not quite knowing what to say or what to sing, certainly. It took a while to figure that out and to muster the courage to do it.”


see also:

this week's CD & DVD releases

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