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June 29, 2012

Shorties (The Walkmen, The Best Books Set in the Midwest, and more)

Walkmen frontman Hamilton Leithauser talks to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel about the band's new album, Heaven.


Flavorwire lists 10 of the best books set in the Midwest.


Fuse interviews Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan.

"The last 10 years in rock n' roll has been very, very difficult to watch because it's basically turned into a bunch of McDonald's commercials," Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan tells Fuse. "That’s why I get very argumentative with the indie class, because if you don't let [indie] bands rise up to the mainstream, that's what you get... [when] you get precocious and keep it in New York or Seattle."


At The Weeklings, Sean Beadouin explains why he started writing young adult fiction.

I started writing YA for one reason and one reason only: the vast number of editors who gleefully lined up not to buy my short story collection. Which, frankly, was a little mystifying. Each story had already been published. Most in reasonably august literary journals. Two won prizes. One even appeared in Spirit–the inflight magazine of Southwest Airlines. Still, zero interest. It’s conceivable that the title, Kitten Steaks, played a role in dissuading the less adventurous houses.


Flavorwire lists 10 of the year's most unfairly overlooked albums.


The A.V. Club recommends entry points into the discography of singer-songwriter Gram Parsons.


Mental Floss lists the early jobs of 24 famous writers.


And Vinyly will press you or your loved one's ashes into a set of LPs, with audio provided by you.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviews author Dennis Cooper.


The Second Second Coming is a mockumentary about the Stone Roses reunion.


The Toronto Star breaks down the specific qualities of "the perfect summer read."


The Guardian profiles the Stone Roses reunion.

Even so, Kessler says, this may be the rare reunion that lasts longer than it takes to pay off outstanding debts. For a start, the band still have something to prove, having made only one album recognised as a classic ("the second is a dog"): "I think they'll finish the tour, take a break, then make a record." The fact that the band have signed a record deal supports this contention.


Christopher Beha recommends several books to read after finishing his debut novel What Happened to Sophie Wilder at the Tin House Blog.


PopMatters explores the history of Washington, DC's go-go music scene.


Bookworm wraps up its interview with author Richard Ford.


Brandi Carlile visits The Current for an interview and live performance.


Metro interviews Anthony Bourdain about his new graphic novel Get Jiro!.

Sounds like you've gotten a lot of satisfaction out of doing it, even without the sales coming in yet.

F-- the sales! This is not a commercial venture. This is about the pleasure of picking up that thing and looking at the beautiful artwork that Langdon Foss delivered. It's a new way of telling a story that's deeply satisfying as a former comics nerd, collector and wannabe artist. It's a little boy's dream come true.


Deceptive Cadence explores the wealth of classical music, specifically compositions by Benjamin Britten, in Wes Anderson's new film Moonrise Kingdom.

But the impetus to make Britten integral to Moonrise Kingdom was all Anderson's. The film's duo protagonists, 12-year-olds Sam and Suzy, first meet at a rehearsal for a production of Britten's Noye's Fludde (Noah's Flood) — and this opera written for a mix of professionals and amateurs proves integral to the film's plot.


Fresh Air interviews Marcus Sakey about his new memoir, Yes, Chef.


The Line of Best Fit lists the best albums of 2012 so far.


Win two of the year's finest debut novels, Karen Thompson Walker's The Age of Miracles and Carol Rifka Brunt's Tell the Wolves I'm Home, and a $100 Threadless gift certificate in this week's Largehearted Boy contest.


Amazon MP3 has 100 digital albums on sale for $5.

Amazon MP3 also features 25 of its bestselling albums on sale for $2.99.


Follow me on Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, Pinterest, Facebook, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" columns.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics & graphic novels)
daily mp3 downloads
Largehearted Word (the week's best new books)
Try It Before You Buy It (mp3s and full album streams from this week's CD releases)
weekly music & DVD release lists


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