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October 10, 2014

Book Notes - Hannah Pittard "Reunion"

Reunion

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Hannah Pittard's impressive new novel has been called "a dreamlike cross between The Virgin Suicides and The Lovely Bones," and features one of the most unforgettable unreliable narrators I have ever encountered.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"A warm and witty look at an unusual dysfunctional family... Truly engaging."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Hannah Pittard's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Reunion:


What I love about this exercise is that it asks me to do what I'm almost always doing in my head at any given moment of the day. As I kid, I was such a romantic. I desperately wanted to live my life inside a John Hughes movie. I didn't just want the happy ending. I wanted the heartache that led up to the happy ending. The closest I could come to living inside a movie was through music. Even when it wasn't playing, I pretended it was. And often — this is embarrassing, but… — often I'd even pretend there was a camera on me. So while my parents might have been minding their own business – sitting in the front seat on a drive across town to eat Chinese, say – I was probably in the back seat, imagining what I looked like on screen to all of my viewers and imagining also what mournful (always mournful) song they might be listening to as I went on with my listless life. In many ways, I've been waiting to be asked for this playlist since the day I hit puberty.

"The Only Living Boy in New York" – Simon & Garfunkel

This might seem like an obvious pick because the song is about a plane ride, and my book begins on a plane, but it's also the perfect opener 1) because of the tone (a magical combination of hope and despair) and 2) because it's the song I've listened to the most number of times in my life, on planes and off them. It's a song that feels both like the beginning and the end. And because http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0989360466/ref=nosim/largeheartedb-20">Reunion is my most autobiographical novel (side note: I have never cheated on my husband, but I have been in epic credit card debt), I am giving this song to Kate, my narrator, who, as the novel begins, is sitting on an airplane with news that her father has just committed suicide.

"Common People" – Pulp

Kate's a mess. She's also in debt. She and her husband have a wicked fight early on in the novel. "Common People" is my go-to song when I need to run a 7-minute mile. Kate doesn't need to run a 7-minute mile, but after the argument, she's filled with a similar sort of energetic rage. Since she and her husband are in public (at the airport) when the fight goes down, Kate can't scream. But I can totally see her finding a bathroom stall, putting in her earphones, and dancing the shit out of this song afterwards.

"The Nights Too Long" – Lucinda Williams

I'm a Lucinda Williams nut, but somehow I only recently discovered this song and, as a result, it's been on heavy rotation in my home. It's the story of Sylvia, who says, "I'm moving away, I'm gonna get what I want… I won't be needing these silly dresses and nylon hose ‘cause when I get to where I'm going, I'm going to buy me all new clothes." Sylvia is both optimistic and doleful. She is aching for life, for experience, for something bigger and better than what she has. So is Kate. (So are we all? Sometimes? Most of the time?)

"On Saturday Night" – Lyle Lovett

It's a song about getting high with your family, which happens – in life and in this book.

"Rewrite" – Paul Simon

This song is playing as Kate drunkenly sets the table for dinner. It's apt since she's a failed screenwriter who might very soon be looking for work at a carwash.

"Corpus Christi Bay" – Robert Earle Keen

This is a lugubrious, earnest snapshot of brotherhood and drunkenness. If it's a love story, it's a love story between two brothers: "We were bad for one another, but we were good at having fun." http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0989360466/ref=nosim/largeheartedb-20">Reunion is, in its way, a love story between siblings. But what makes this song so perfect is that Kate, the narrator, is pining for a time that no longer exists. Her siblings have moved on; they've grown up. But there's also a clarity towards the end of the novel that Kate is moving towards. Alcohol is the least of her troubles (maybe not least?), but this song certainly hints at her nearing epiphany: "If I could live my life all over, it wouldn't matter anyway because I never could stay sober…"

"Most of the Time" – Bob Dylan

It's morning, the day of the funeral, and Kate gets a phone call from her husband that she's been both expecting and dreading. The sound of the song fits the mood of the moment beautifully, but so do the lyrics. "Most of the time she ain't even in my mind… I don't pretend. I don't even care if I ever see her again. Most of the time." Kate's a liar who's been trying to come clean about her feelings, but that's a hard thing to do when you disagree with your own heart.

"Keep Me in Your Heart" – Warren Zevon

This is non-negotiable. This is the song you should play as you read the final chapter. It's a song I can't listen to without crying. It's a song I can barely think of without crying. I think first – because you have to – of Warren Zevon himself. It's his song and it's his plea: "I'm running out of breath. Keep me in your hearts for while. If I leave you, it doesn't mean I love you any less…" It's so sincere, so simple, so honest. So the words are his, yes, but they're also the words of anyone who has ever been left or who's ever leaving or about to leave. This song captures everything Kate can't articulate.

"Neighborhood #1 (Tunnels)" – Arcade Fire

Finally, because this is a book about childhood and about family and, most of all, siblings, the song that you should listen to after you finish and – if I've done my job – while you're still imagining Kate, imagining those next few minutes and maybe those next few hours, especially if you stay with the idea of her long enough to envision her on the flight home, this is the song. This is definitely the song that's playing as the plane takes off.


Hannah Pittard and Reunion links:

the author's website

Booklist review
BookPage review
Bustle review
Chicago Tribune review
Harvard Crimson review
Publishers Weekly review

Gapers Block interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


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